what is this

how did this get here i am not good with computers

(Source: tremoloep, via zdarsky)

I spent 5000 years laughing at this guy’s celebration

onthesideoftheotters:

crazypeoplejail:

image

help me I can’t stop laughing

DID HE JUST RUN ALL THE WAY TO THE SEATS TO CLAP FOR HIS TEAM OMFG

(via if-i-was-real)

http://blog.jeffgerstmann.net/post/74759021163/this-email-is-too-long-to-make-it-onto-the-podcast

jeffgerstmann:

This email is too long to make it onto the podcast this week but I felt I should let people see… this.

Dear my fav podcast, although all podcasts are created equal
Just like all humans are equal and all living things that harbor energy are equal

I am writing you today to explain what I…

starwars:

Artist of the Week - Noriyoshi Ohrai

starwars:

Artist of the Week - Noriyoshi Ohrai

(Source: gnarville, via if-i-was-real)

moviecode:

From: http://deeperdesign.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/is-iron-man-made-of-lego/
I was re-watching Iron Man recently and noticed something interesting.  During Iron Man’s first “boot up sequence”, in the “terrorist” caves of Nowhereistan, some butchered C code is displayed on a faked up laptop screen.
The code displayed on screen, although missing some syntactically important characters such as semi-colons, is actual valid C source code.  So valid in fact that I wondered where it came from.
After a quick Google I found it. This code is in fact as follows:
    send[0] = 0x65;
    send[1] = 1;
    send[2] = 3;
    send[3] = 5;
    send[4] = 7;
    send[5] = 11;

    if (rcx_sendrecv(fd, send, 6, recv, 1, 50, RETRIES, use_comp) != 1) {
	fprintf(stderr, "%s: delete firmware failed\n", progname);
	exit(1);
    }

    /* Start firmware download */
    send[0] = 0x75;
    send[1] = (start >> 0) & 0xff;
    send[2] = (start >> 8) & 0xff;
    send[3] = (cksum >> 0) & 0xff;
    send[4] = (cksum >> 8) & 0xff;
    send[5] = 0;

    if (rcx_sendrecv(fd, send, 6, recv, 2, 50, RETRIES, use_comp) != 2) {
	fprintf(stderr, "%s: start firmware download failed\n", progname);
	exit(1);
    }

    /* Transfer data */
    addr = 0;
    index = 1;
    for (addr = 0, index = 1; addr < len; addr += size, index++) {
The code above comes from a firmware downloader for the RCX (a programmable, microcontroller-based Lego brick), written in 1998 at Stanford University by Kekoa Proudfoot. You can get the full source file here and it is distributed under the Mozilla Public License.  This is the same license used by Firefox and many other Open Source software products.
The sequence in the film in which this code appears suggests that the code is either being downloaded as firmware to the Iron Man suit or being used to upload firmware to an RCX Lego brick that is somehow involved in the operation of Iron Man.
So it appears that Iron Man is either powered by Open Source software or made of Lego.  I’m not sure which is cooler.

moviecode:

From: http://deeperdesign.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/is-iron-man-made-of-lego/

I was re-watching Iron Man recently and noticed something interesting.  During Iron Man’s first “boot up sequence”, in the “terrorist” caves of Nowhereistan, some butchered C code is displayed on a faked up laptop screen.

The code displayed on screen, although missing some syntactically important characters such as semi-colons, is actual valid C source code.  So valid in fact that I wondered where it came from.

After a quick Google I found it. This code is in fact as follows:

    send[0] = 0x65;
    send[1] = 1;
    send[2] = 3;
    send[3] = 5;
    send[4] = 7;
    send[5] = 11;

    if (rcx_sendrecv(fd, send, 6, recv, 1, 50, RETRIES, use_comp) != 1) {
	fprintf(stderr, "%s: delete firmware failed\n", progname);
	exit(1);
    }

    /* Start firmware download */
    send[0] = 0x75;
    send[1] = (start >> 0) & 0xff;
    send[2] = (start >> 8) & 0xff;
    send[3] = (cksum >> 0) & 0xff;
    send[4] = (cksum >> 8) & 0xff;
    send[5] = 0;

    if (rcx_sendrecv(fd, send, 6, recv, 2, 50, RETRIES, use_comp) != 2) {
	fprintf(stderr, "%s: start firmware download failed\n", progname);
	exit(1);
    }

    /* Transfer data */
    addr = 0;
    index = 1;
    for (addr = 0, index = 1; addr < len; addr += size, index++) {

The code above comes from a firmware downloader for the RCX (a programmable, microcontroller-based Lego brick), written in 1998 at Stanford University by Kekoa Proudfoot. You can get the full source file here and it is distributed under the Mozilla Public License.  This is the same license used by Firefox and many other Open Source software products.

The sequence in the film in which this code appears suggests that the code is either being downloaded as firmware to the Iron Man suit or being used to upload firmware to an RCX Lego brick that is somehow involved in the operation of Iron Man.

So it appears that Iron Man is either powered by Open Source software or made of Lego.  I’m not sure which is cooler.

(Source: elprento, via if-i-was-real)